The curatorial

Curatorial Politics
M1/M2
English/French (texts)

Doreen Mende
Start: 12 October 2020, 10am

“And we cannot assume that we will accomplish that in our lifetime.” (Angela Davis) –– The seminar curatorial/politics in 2020/21 is called Modernity’s Grandchildren. Who are modernity’s grandchildren? The seminar claims that the participants of the curatorial/politics seminar are.

We will continue to engage with practices of relationality by the means of art this year. We will aim at engaging with curatorial methods and artistic forms that speak to the relationality between generations and geographies. Our point of entry into the space-time between generations are transgenerational problems or gaps or threads as the lubricant for living the life of modernity’s grandchildren. We may understand modernity as a complex worldmaking project that has been built on the “differential principle” (Ariella Aïsha Azoulay) in respect to race, gender, sexuality and knowledge as value-making systems. This principle operates the violent split between exclusion and inclusion by political, structural, psychological and technological means of transacting value into faculties of power.

The seminar takes place in a moment of important movements departing from Black Lives Matter, the SARS-Covid2-pandemic condition, the call for the abolition of the university or “the university: last words” (Fred Moten/Stefano Harney), abolitionist feminism and the end of the world as we know it. In this transformative moment, I found it necessary to re-engage with practices of relationality in respect to transgenerational problems as a creative source. The transgenerational shall not be dominated by a hereditary concern. Because the generational is different to the dynastical or the biological family. Yet, the generational appears in cultural, social or political bodies of knowledge that seem specific for a particular generation as well as geography: What can we learn from previous generations? And what better not? Where or when do we detect the absence of a previous generation? What does it mean to think beyond lifetime?

Cultural Studies

Cultural Studies
M1 et M2: Anne-Julie Raccoursier (en français et anglais)

Les Cultural Studies 2015/16 ouvrent un champ d’étude transdisciplinaire et critique qui prend pour objet les institutions, les pratiques et les formes culturelles dans leurs relations aux structures politiques dominantes, aux hiérarchies sociales et aux minorités marginalisées. L’enseignement met en relation les théories et les méthodes qui fondent ce champ d’étude avec des pratiques artistiques situées, discursives, interventionnistes. Le séminaire alternera exposés, lectures et travaux pratiques.

Études Politiques « Comment juger? »

Études Politiques
M1/M2
French/English

Pierre Hazan
Début: 9 Octobre, 2017, 10.00

Faisons table rase du passé ?

Les révolutionnaires français rêvaient de faire table rase du passé. Mais force est de constater que le passé n’est pas encore passé, il a même un très grand avenir. La constitution de l’identité aussi bien personnelle que collective, le système de valeurs, la projection d’une société dans l’avenir dépend largement de la représentation qu’elle se fait de son passé. Le démantèlement des statues du général Lee à Charlottesville et de Christophe Colomb à New York, la destruction des œuvres d’art par Daech en Irak ou l’érection de monuments à Genève le montrent de manière saisissante. Comment se construit et se modifie le lien au passé et à quel passé ? Quel regard porter aujourd’hui sur le colonialisme et la traite esclavagiste ? Selon quelle lecture historique ? Selon quelle vision de la culture, de la vérité et de la justice ? L’enjeu de ce cours vise à mieux appréhender les ressorts de la représentation du passé dans l’espace public.

Publication : les étudiants seront amenés à travailler sur des œuvres en construction ou faisant l’objet d’une discussion sur leur destruction/démantèlement, ou qu’ils souhaiteraient détruire. Dans leur texte, les étudiants devront analyser les enjeux idéologiques et esthétiques, les dynamiques politiques, le rôle de l’artiste et des pouvoirs publics. L’ensemble de leurs contributions, éventuellement enrichies de contributions extérieures, feront l’objet d’une publication.

Pratiques artistiques situées

Pratiques artistiques situées
Situated Art Practices

M1/M2
French/English

Anne-Julie Raccoursier, Tarek Lakhrissi

Start : 5 octobre 2020

The CCC ResearchMaster Program  promotes artistic research. It transforms the conception of artistic practices and develops independent information through the study of critical sources and formats. It explores the role of art in society and considers artistic practice as the production of organic knowledge in the context of production. The seminar, taught throughout the curriculum, is conducted in close collaboration with the Writing Research Practice seminar. It offers training in the methodologies of research through the means of art and allows students, based on discussions around their projects, to build devices to make their research public. It promotes a conception of research that is mutualized and step-by-step. It is based on a conception of artistic practice that is conscious of the differences in cultures and languages and concerned with the economic mechanisms of society and their political dimension. It develops critical, analytical and visionary strategies and encourages interventions – both individual and collective – with multifaceted meanings in a wide range of formats and situations. Research is carried out in technical reproduction media and experimental formats. The artistic practice is situated, discursive, interventionist, politically engaged and transdisciplinary. The Program supports art engaged in the public sphere or in civil society, understood as theater of debate and deliberation, as an intermediary place between private space and institutions.

Writing Research Practice

Writing Research Practice
M1/M2
French/English

Çağla Aykaç

Start: 30 September 2020, 10am

The Writing Research Practice Seminar is a space where you refine your individual research project and design, build your personal archive, and work your voice. It is also a space for self-reflexivity and for understanding where and how you stand in relation to your own research, and more generally in relation to research ethics and art research practice.

The Writing Research Practice Seminar works together with the Situated Art Practices Seminar.  While you will have opportunities to discuss your individual research punctually in tutorials and with your thesis advisors (2nd year), the Writing Research Practice seminar is a space for sharing your research with other students and getting feed-back on your writing throughout your two years at the CCC.

Each session of the Seminar is constructed around a chosen theme (archive, critique, method, voice, standpoint, kinship, power, time & space,..) with common assigned readings.  For each meeting, you are asked to bring additional readings related to your own research and a piece of your own writing. The Acte de Recherche you write during this seminar will be published at the end of the year and will be used as a presentation of your research.

Critical Studies

Critical Studies
M1/M2
English

Gene Ray

Start : 28 September 2020, 10am

As our social worlds are convulsed by multiple crises (pandemic, economic, political, ecological), “normality” and indeed “the future” have been called into question and put in doubt. Uprisings in response to the police murder of George Floyd in Minneapolis in late May, and of more young Black men and women gunned down after him, have not been deterred either by the horrendous Covid-19 pandemic or by the terror of the racist paramilitary right. This November, fascism and white supremacism are on the ballot in the USA. The results will certainly have planetary repercussions.

One conspicuous feature of the anti-racist uprisings has been the iconoclastic attacks on monuments to Confederate generals and settler-colonial slavers. Iconoclastic resistance quickly spread to the UK and Europe, and indeed was already ongoing in Chile and Mexico, among other places. Such iconoclasm has a long history in the cultural politics of memory.

In this context of planetary crises and uprisings, the critical studies seminar this year will focus on arts and practices of cultural memory and memorial cultures. Acknowledging the vitality and power of iconoclasm “from below” in public spaces and streets in the present struggles for social and ecological justice, the seminar will begin with the attack on monumental dominators, with attention to some select precursors: the toppling of the Vendôme column during the Paris Commune; the Place Clichy action carried out in Paris in March 1969 by students and faculty of the École des Beaux Arts in collaboration with the Situationist International; the attacks on monuments to Christopher Columbus beginning on the 500th anniversary of the transatlantic European invasion; the dismemberment of an equestrian statue of Spanish conquistador Juan de Oñate y Salazar in Alcade, New Mexico in 1998; and the movement to remove statues and symbols commemorating the Confederacy, including an equestrian statue of Robert E. Lee in Charlottesville, Virginia, controversy around which provided a pretext for the infamous “Unite the Right” rally in August 2017. We’ll reconsider current iconoclasm in light of this history and try to draw some conclusions.

From actions in the streets and public spaces, we’ll turn to the art world and its gallery spaces. Key debates about the representation of traumatic history in art, namely the challenge to traditional representational norms – or indeed the crisis of representation – provoked by the scale of the Nazi genocide and the US nuclear bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in World War II, will be surveyed. Divergent strategies of artistic representation will be reviewed and studied through some films and visual material. Consideration of both the streets and squares and the galleries as differentiated fields of action should lead us to an appreciation for Walter Benjamin’s claim that the dead fight on both sides in the class war and that, if the fascists win, “not even [our] dead will be safe.”